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margaret
Member
Posts: 9

We thought long and hard about whether to neuter Paddy. We definately believed in allowing him to mature physically as well as socially before doing it. Since we have had no problems of aggression, humping other dogs or straying after bitches we decided to leave him entire. He is now three and a half and continues to be a beautifully mannered dog. He has had a problem with his anal glands and a tendency to loose stools, we feed him on a hypoallergenic diet but the problem flares up occasionally. During a recent visit to the vet it was suggested that his prostate might be becoming enlarged and that castration might be wise. I would welcome any advice/information on prostate problems, how the prostate can affect bowel habits or on castrating an older dog.

February 23, 2015 at 6:46 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Cass
Member
Posts: 94

If your vet believes it will help him be healthier than I would follow your vet's advice.  Neutering a dog that is 3 and a half and fully mature will not change him in any way - he will still behave the same way he did before castration.  My last dog I had to have neutered around the same age and it didn't change him a bit.  He was still the same great dog :)  Castration only has real negative effects if done prior to the dog reaching physical and mental maturity.  I wouldn't think twice - if it will alleviate his prostate issues do it.

February 25, 2015 at 12:08 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Neill
Member
Posts: 1280

Castration can lead to weight gain and increased coat density in male dogs.  I'm opposed to castrating dogs unless there are sound medical or behavioural reasons.  With Paddy this may be the case, but I don't know why a prostate problem would affect his bowl, the prostate surrounds the urethra not the lower intestine. 

 

Frankly, anal gland problems can occur in any dog, entire or otherwise, and loose stools are much more likely to be diet related.  I'd not take any decision based on a vet saying his prostate "might" be enlarged, it's easy enough to check for certain.  Get a second opinion in my view.

--

Every time I take my dog out for a lesson, he never fails to teach me something!!!!!!!

Neill

February 26, 2015 at 9:15 AM Flag Quote & Reply

margaret
Member
Posts: 9

Neill at February 26, 2015 at 9:15 AM

Castration can lead to weight gain and increased coat density in male dogs.  I'm opposed to castrating dogs unless there are sound medical or behavioural reasons.  With Paddy this may be the case, but I don't know why a prostate problem would affect his bowl, the prostate surrounds the urethra not the lower intestine. 

 

Frankly, anal gland problems can occur in any dog, entire or otherwise, and loose stools are much more likely to be diet related.  I'd not take any decision based on a vet saying his prostate "might" be enlarged, it's easy enough to check for certain.  Get a second opinion in my view.

Thanks Cass and Neill

I agree with both of you. I think we need a second opinion first. Obviouly if the second vet agrees we would take his/her advice. I do just have a feeling that neutering is fashionable these days, driven perhaps by the animal rescue groups who obviously have justifiable motivation to reduce the numbers of unwanted dogs, and so I want to be sure before i put him through an operation. I read a metanalysis of all dog breeds, related to the breed type, neutering and health issues. It claimed to show that for cocker spaniels obesity,leading to heart disease and diabetes, was a greater risk than other problems caused by testosterone. As you say Neill castration does seem to increase weight and it might be a struggle to maintain a healthy weight. It was different for labs for example. I dont really know how proven this all was though.

Thanks for your input. I appreciate it.

February 27, 2015 at 9:40 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Svenk
Member
Posts: 124

You might want to ask another vet how the prostrate, bowl, and being entire are linked, because I've never heard of it myself. Castration and his bank account, though, are linked!


Here in Sweden, very very few dogs are done, unless there is some pressing problem that it will address, or it is thought it will address. Funnily enough, there aren't dogs dying left right and centre from all the possible ailments that castration and sterilisation are supposed to prevent. 

--

www.hundgubbe.se

February 27, 2015 at 11:01 AM Flag Quote & Reply

margaret
Member
Posts: 9

Svenk at February 27, 2015 at 11:01 AM

You might want to ask another vet how the prostrate, bowl, and being entire are linked, because I've never heard of it myself. Castration and his bank account, though, are linked!


Here in Sweden, very very few dogs are done, unless there is some pressing problem that it will address, or it is thought it will address. Funnily enough, there aren't dogs dying left right and centre from all the possible ailments that castration and sterilisation are supposed to prevent. 

I have read that, whilst in humans, an enlarged prostate presses on the urethra and reduces urine flow in dogs it makes emptying the bowel more difficult and can result in ribbon like stools. Paddy has perfectly cylindrical but sometimes very sloppy stools.

February 27, 2015 at 12:38 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Breezybrook
Administrator
Posts: 255

It is easy to have his prostate checked, firstly a digital examination followed by an ultrasound.

If the prostate is enlarged it can but not necessarily affect his bowl movements and it can affect his ability to urinate which can become quite serious very quickly.

If he needs doing I wouldn't hestiate, if his prostate is not enlarged you will probably leave him be.

He is not a typical age for prostate problems, on average for dogs that have a problem they start having problems around 7 yrs, but there are always exceptions...


As for undesired side effects, the coat is likely to "blow" which is not a massive problem. As for weight gain, they can put on weight, but careful diet management can prevent this. A nuetered dog only becomes a fat dog if allowed to do so.

Basically the production of hormoes takes energy, this comes from their food. Remove the hormones (neuter) and the need for that much energy is reduced, so reduce the food intake.

If you get a dog or bitch neutered you should halve their food from the day they have the op. Monitor their weight weekly over the next few months and adjust to need, but it is my experience that halving the diet is about correct.

If the dog is allowed to get fat though it becomes a devil of a job to get rid of the fat, in fact its near impossible so be warned and prevent it happening by halving the food as above.

The plus side is operation pays for itself by decreased feeding costs.


--

Jacquie

Breezybrook Gundogs

www.breezybrookgundogs.co.uk           

www.breederscan.co.uk 

.

March 18, 2015 at 2:06 PM Flag Quote & Reply

Lynn
Member
Posts: 217

I would not choose to castrate a dog, unless there are underlying issues, such as aggression. Our previous cocker was castrated at 2 years of age.This was done in an attempt to curb his aggression. It made little difference to his temperament, but did cause him to gain weight, and his coat, which had previously been smooth and glossy, became woolly and very hard to manage.


When Bailey was younger, he suffered with anal gland problems. Our vet wanted to remove his glands, but following advice from some members on here, we tried him on a ‘raw diet’. Within weeks, the problem had all but gone away. We continue to feed him on as much raw food as possible, along with both fresh and tinned fish, (he no longer has any kibble or commercial dog food) and have had no further problems.  I would suggest you try making changes to Paddy’s diet, increasing the bone content, which does help to clear out the glands.


An enlarged prostate will cause very distressing symptoms for a dog. Our previous cocker contracted Lymphoma at the age of five, one of the symptoms being an enlarged prostate. He would constantly think he needed to pee, so would be asking to go out all of the time. But once outside, although in his head he needed to go, he was unable to pass urine. He would stay outside for ages, trying to go over and over, becoming quite frantic. It was very distressing to watch him.  It would be hard to say whether or not the enlarged prostate also affected his bowels, as the medication he was on disrupted his whole system. I would suggest you get a second opinion about Paddy's prostate.

 

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March 18, 2015 at 3:45 PM Flag Quote & Reply

marc
Member
Posts: 242

My dog has had a slightly enlarged prostae since he was about 3 and a half.  He has had anal gland problems off and on for years and this is how they found his prostate problem.  I would guess there are many dogs with this problem and they are not known about as no one has checked their anal glands.  My vet suggested neutering but I've always been against it unless it is for life threatening reasons.  She said I could try tablets (I think for a week) the effects would last for about 4 to 6 months.  They did reduce the size of his prostate.

I now feed Ollie Natures diet once a day and his fish for dogs at night.  This stiffens his poo up which I believe squezzes his anal glands.  The last vet I saw said his prostate was slightly enlarged again and to keep an eye on it and maybe think about neutering, but I could have the tablets agin if a problem.  I was also told that if a dog holds its self by not going to the toilet it can cause prostate problems.  Ours wont go at home, he has to go away from the house.  Started to take him out more often and fingers crossed it will help.

A little cocker bitch down the road had her glands removed years ago and she still scoots along the ground.

August 20, 2015 at 2:50 PM Flag Quote & Reply

margaret
Member
Posts: 9

Just an update. Paddy was neutered two months ago. A second vet concurred that his prostate was enlarged. He has been fine. We can see no differences at all so far but we did reduce his food intake by 25%. Thanks for all the advice. it was appreciated.

August 21, 2015 at 7:17 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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